Running Strong

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Feel the Glow

One of our favorite mantras here at SFH is summed up by this quote, “Move and then move more, you will never regret it”. Exercise is one of the most important keys to unlocking a positive attitude, feeling confident, beautiful and celebrating the happy moments in life. And now that summer is in full swing, we’ve received a lot of questions about exercise and nutrition from our readers so we thought it would be perfect timing to list our exercise recommendations, beginning with a good run!

I love to run (more than the rest of the team) and I know a lot of women who are avid runners these days. It’s one of those things that doesn’t require previous athletic ability in order to get started. And the results are amazing!

I can’t begin to explain how running has personally impacted my life but it has been vital to my health, both physical and mental. Our lives are busier now than ever and the stress from the way we live in 2018 can take a toll on our ability to stay focused on what’s important. Research on this subject confirms when we run, we not only release endorphins but also enhance the growth of new nerve cells in the brain that are linked to learning and memory.  Running also builds bone density (an important key to our health as we age), gives us a better self-image, stimulates confidence both mentally and physically, helps to increase metabolism and provides an overall feeling of well-being. Seriously, ladies, who doesn’t want a little of this medicine?

If you want to begin running and you’ve never been a runner, be sure you’re in good health before you begin. If necessary, visit your doctor for a checkup and let them know you’re going to begin a running program. Start slow and work up to your goals at your own pace so you see and feel results and don’t get discouraged.

Here we go!

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Carve out 30 minutes of your day (4x per week) to either run on the treadmill or outside. I prefer outside but sometimes the weather doesn’t cooperate so the treadmill is my next best option.

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Be sure to make yourself accountable by telling a friend you’re beginning a running program or post on social media that you’ve begun your training. Get others involved so you have to provide updates. This will get you out the door on days that you’re not feeling it and help you see progress sooner than later.

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Buy a great pair of running shoes, make a “running” playlist to take with you on your run (I use Spotify), wear comfortable clothes and hit the road! I’ve outlined a basic training week below that you can replicate to get started. Continue to use the training program weekly to help guide your progress.


Day 1: 30 Minutes

Warm up by running in place for a few minutes and then stretch out your calf and thigh muscles using basic stretches. Don’t stretch too hard, just a nice soft stretch to help eliminate any potential leg cramps or muscle tightening.

When you get out on your first day, time yourself and stay out for 30 minutes. Do a run/walk combo. I recommend running for 1 minute, walk for 2 minutes. Run for 1 minute, walk for 2 minutes. Do this run/walk system the entire 30 minutes your out for your run.

Don’t forget to hydrate! Water will help you to not only feel less fatigued when you’re finished but will also help flush out the toxins your body will be processing from sweating.


Day 2: 30 Minutes

Repeat Day 1


Day 3: Rest Day


Day 4: 30 Minutes

Repeat Day 1


Day 5: 30 Minutes

Repeat Day 1


Day 6: Rest Day


Day 7: 30 Minutes + Miles

Today you should map out how far you’d like to run and increase your run/walk to 5 minutes running and no more than 2 minutes walking. At this point, you should see a slight difference in your stamina and the ability to run longer than you did on Day 1.

Repeat this first week for the next several weeks and eventually, you will be running a full mile without walking!

We definitely want to hear from each of you who begins a running or exercise program so be sure to post on our She’s Finding Happy Facebook page.   Let’s inspire each other with pictures, updates, progress, milestones, etc! We can’t wait to celebrate with you!

Now Let’s Talk Nutrition:

Beginning any workout or exercise routine requires a healthy diet so don’t cheat your body of healthy proteins and fats. Here are a few easy and delicious recipes I recommend from our Health and Nutrition contributor, Chef Karista Bennett. Enjoy!

Farro & Summer Peach Salad

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Pan Cooked Chicken Breasts with Sweet Mini Pepper Relish

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Salad Lyonnaise

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A Bitter Pill

One of life’s most bitter pills to swallow is the realization that perhaps you haven’t quite conquered the pain of your past demons.  Sometimes these pesky guys find a way into your everyday life no matter how hard you have worked to overcome them.   At that moment, your heart splits wide open as your mind beats you up for momentarily losing the battle.   And then a sobering sense of reality falls upon you and allows you to acknowledge that you are only human and recognizing the pain from the past makes you stronger as long as you leave it there. 

Waste not fresh tears over old griefs.  ~Euripides, Alexander

Leaving the past behind and learning to get rid of the clutter the past can sometimes deposit into our brains, is a healthy step to keeping a life full of love, peace and satisfaction.  It is not that any of us, including myself, wish to have these moments clutter our lives and make our hearts more vulnerable and insecure.  Most of us just want to move on and feel the freeing sense of peace that enveloped us when we made the decision to move our lives forward in the first place.

Let us not look back in anger, nor forward in fear, but around in awareness.  ~James Thurber

It seems the first step to keeping ourselves from having to swallow that bitter pill more than once in a lifetime, is to acknowledge the past for what it was but never allow it to control us, our lives, our hearts or our minds.  Leave it in the past and know that who we are today is a stronger, better version of who we were then.  The second step is to surround ourselves with those who will love us unconditionally; however, will not allow us to fall into the trap of dwelling on the past.  Sometimes “tough love” is the best kind of love for those of us who have worked diligently to leave the hurt behind but find ourselves in a moment of emotional self-destruction.  These individuals, who love us for who we are, provide us with the compassion and honesty that are key to our success.  Sophocles said it beautifully…

“One word frees us of all the weight and pain of life: that word is LOVE.”

If you are struggling with hurt, insecurity or another demon from the past, embrace the NOW and those you love who are in the NOW with you.  Leave behind those things that weigh you down and keep you from living the productive and happy life you were meant to live.  Embrace the beauty of the present and look forward to the joys of the future.

Locked Inside the House of Fear

“Stand up to your obstacles and do something about them. You will find that they haven’t half the strength you think they have.” — Norman Vincent Peale

There are times in our lives when we reach a crossroad before us and we haven’t a clue how to proceed.  We are faced with a challenge, a difficult decision or a painful life dilemma and it lingers around us begging for answers.  We want out of the house of fear but end up succumbing to the safety net of not having to make a difficult decision because we are  afraid of the unknown, afraid of the obstacle and unsure of the path we should take.  We have all been at this point; however, what separates us from the rest is how we overcome the fear and conquer the obstacle that is keeping us from reaching goals or simply moving life forward.

Fear keeps us from success because it causes deep-rooted insecurity, anxiety and low self-worth.  This unfortunately leads to poor decision-making and/or ignoring the inevitable or on the flip side, ignoring the possible.

I was fortunate to be among a group of women at a professional women’s event recently where one of the speakers said something powerful that resonated deep inside, “If you must make a difficult decision, ask yourself this question, am I making this decision out of fear or out of courage?”  – Dr. Deborah German.  Dr. German’s point being, always make your decision out of courage, even if you fail.   The courageous decision will move your life forward, allow you to unlock the door and exit the house of fear which releases you from the anxiety and insecurity blocking your success.

Many of us find ourselves facing obstacles everyday, some more difficult than others; however, as women, as mothers, as friends we have the power within to fight back, be courageous, be supportive of each other and move our lives forward; leaving behind the house of fear and opening doors to finding success and pursuing wonderful new dreams.

Thank you & You’re Welcome

A few weeks ago, I witnessed how a friend of mine had so deeply instilled a sense of appreciation and gratitude in her children.  I watched and I admired love and graciousness and although the economic times had delivered a severe blow to their family, there were smiles, there were hugs for everyone, there was a sense of well-being despite the tough circumstances.  They displayed appreciation for their parents and the sacrifices they had made to make all of their lives complete…I thought to myself, these are good parents and we could all learn a little something from them.

Raising children who appreciate what they have been given can be a daunting task for parents these days.  Perhaps it is our incessant need to be their friend instead of their parent, perhaps it is a lack of time to invest in instilling gratefulness, perhaps it is easier to cater to their every need rather than say “no” and have to wage a battle of wills.

I’m the first to admit parenting is a complicated job because it requires not only our full-time attention but our emotional and mental strength and let’s face it, there are not too many of us with a lot of spare time in our day.  Whether you are a work-at-home parent or a work-outside-the-home parent, life is fast paced and full of  “gratefulness obstacles”.   Taking the time to teach our children to appreciate not only what they have, but to appreciate us as their parents is imperative to raising a well-balanced child who will eventually become a well-balanced and successful adult.

I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought; and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder.  ~G.K. Chesterton

 A child who is appreciative typically understands what you’ve sacrificed or given whole-heartedly as a parent (even if they are not willing to admit it).   This also creates respect, which is a key element to appreciation and gratefulness.  There has been enormous debate recently, regarding the Tiger Mom and her views on parenting and although this concept is from a completely different culture and not widely accepted or utilized among the typical American family, it does spark conversation on how we, as parents, can successfully instill responsibility and respect into our children.   I believe there is a middle ground out there that works but it is not without parental effort, dedication and follow through.

Courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart.  ~Henry Clay

Through my parenting years I’ve learned that in general, children do not see past what effects their immediate world, which is a natural response, especially for the challenging teen years.  On the flip side, it’s important to consistently discuss gratefulness and appreciation with our children and provide examples of what it means and how it feels.  Asking them to write a thank you note for a gift, requiring them to say “thank you” every time someone, even a family member, does something nice or helpful, helping someone in need and even parental instruction, advice and rule setting can bring about a more grateful and appreciative child.   They may not see the lesson or the love as the instruction leaves your lips, but it will most certainly be heard and felt and it will provide a basis for gratitude because it shows you care.

I believe in asking our children to work hard for good grades, be responsible with their time, help with chores around the house, be respectful and loving to parents and siblings and in return, mom, dad or both provide the things they need and/or want.  When disrespect, ungrateful expectation and taking parents for granted come into the picture, it’s a red flag to take a step back and evaluate life in your home.  Raising children who appreciate their home and their surroundings, naturally brings with it loving side effects like graciousness, self-respect, self-confidence and overall happier children…that is well worth the effort.